Posts Tagged ‘shooting’

By Eric Louie

Last night I covered another community outrage after police killed a black man. Police say he was a stabbing suspect with a knife that left them no choice but to shoot when confronted. Protesters say witness cell phone video shows otherwise.

It’s a story seen many times and in many cities, especially with technologies that let us record images and distribute them through the Web. But this goes further than what happened when five officers fired on Mario Woods that Wednesday afternoon, or even the wider talk of police brutality. 

Last night’s demonstration was during a police commission meeting at City Hall. The largest banner, being used to frame the speakers rallying the crowd outside, read “We are the Last 3% of Black SF.” With the current tech boom others are not just left out, but in some cases physically moved out from rising housing costs with gentrification. During the meeting many speakers identified themselves as native San Franciscans who felt alienated.

Coincidentally, I saw this change first-hand recently. The night after police shot Woods, I was in the same neighborhood working coat check for a welcome party for buyers of newly-built homes. The bus went through the same dilapidated, plywood-covered-window, low-rise apartment housing projects I remember passing through on some occasional journey when young. I had before never taken the 19 Polk to the end of the line before this night, or seen the city from the shipyards my grandfather worked. Though I grew up in San Francisco, there was never a reason to go to Bayview-Hunters Point, with more reasons to avoid it. Once, during a high school journalism camp, I helped navigate us by bus to see a Giants game at Candlestick Park. Many wondered why I took them through a sketchy neighborhood to go there.   

SF City Hall.MarioWoods.12.9.2015

The most heated point last night didn’t come from someone asking police to stay away, but Sala Chandler, whose son Yalani Chinyamurindi was 19 when he was killed with three others in a car earlier this year. She said the fact that her son’s shooting remains unsolved is an example of a low priority for black lives.

Chandler went over her allotted two-minute public speaker time and wouldn’t stop. The audience stood for her support, police walked towards her, and there was some yelling that led to an emergency recess. Commissioners left the room before resuming shortly after. 

“We ain’t going nowhere,” Chandler said into the mic during the chaos.  “We’re gonna shut the streets down.”